Can a Personality Test Help You Find the Perfect Hobby? Share:

By
Patrick Bailey, Contributor
Posted
Monday, February 1, 2021

Discover your personality's DNA with the Core Values Index psychometric assessment.


Tags: #hobbies #personalitytest #CoreValuesIndex

Having a hobby is an important part of enjoying the simple things in life. It's a great way to revitalize while doing something that you genuinely enjoy and are passionate about. In some cases, people have found ways to turn their hobbies into money-making businesses. Despite the numerous benefits of finding a hobby, many people still don't know which ones are best for them.

The most common reason for being unable to find a hobby that sticks is because most people don't align their recreational pursuits with their personalities. Personality dictates a lot about who we are and what we inherently choose to focus on. Maybe you're naturally an introvert, and yet the hobby you're considering involves constantly going out to meet people.

A good first step in figuring out what hobby suits you is to take a reliable personality test.

How Personality Tests Work

People who develop personality tests usually have in-depth knowledge of how humans behave, their decision-making processes, and what influences their actions. The first steps in creating a personality test are defining what's being measured and then how to measure it. This involves numerous traits such as dominance, agility, emotionality and confidence, among others.

Personality is more than just your preference when it comes to interacting with people. It is also about the subconscious things that define even our smallest actions. This is measured by the Core Values Index (CVI). It is the most accurate and reliable way to measure and identify who you are and what makes you tick. With that in mind, how exactly does your personality dictate the kind of hobbies you should pursue?


Discover your personality's DNA with the Core Values Index psychometric assessment.


How Personality Tests Indicate Your Ideal Hobbies

According to the Core Values Index, your personality encompasses a unique blend of four personality types, or core value energies. These four core value energies listed in the CVI are called Builder, Merchant, Innovator, and Banker.

Builders

Builders are people who are mainly defined by power and action. Whenever they walk into a room, they immediately take implicit control just by their mere presence. Builders are people who are eager to invest their time and focus on things they are passionate about. In this way, they hope to always leave behind a lasting monument of themselves in whatever they do. They can lead other people to help them turn their goals and aspirations into something concrete and long-lasting.

Builders are also known to have immense faith in themselves and their ability to create things. This is why their hobbies usually revolve around creating and innovating. Builders might enjoy mountain climbing, playing challenging video games, biking, or even running marathons. What makes a Builder happy is getting things done. They are much more motivated to reach a destination than they are to simply travel without a goal.

Merchants

Merchants are highly engaged and connected people who enjoy building lasting relationships and inspiring new ideas. They are always looking to the future with visions and aspirations while seldom thinking of the risks associated. Merchants heavily rely on their creative side to stay engaged. Such people often enjoy painting, doing charity work, and exploring new places and experiences. Their resilience and hope for the future also propels them toward nurturing hobbies like gardening and taking care of animals. They make outstanding club leaders and organizers.

Innovators

Innovators are people who are mainly defined by their wisdom and compassion. They love to solve problems. Those with a lot of Innovator energy in their personality profile are highly reliable people who can silently step back and evaluate a situation. This is so they can provide solutions that are often very helpful in society.

In their free time, Innovators love to engage in complex yet fulfilling tasks. This may involve charity work, creating science projects, volunteering for an AA crisis hotline, and even meditation — pretty much anything that lets them solve challenging problems. An Innovator's compassionate side also draws them towards cooking for their friends and family, and nurturing children.

Bankers

Bankers are highly defined by their core value, the gathering of knowledge. They like to know how and why things work. Bankers take the collection and preservation of knowledge very seriously, and thus you'll frequently find a banker buried in a book or scouring the internet in their free time. Bankers also enjoy playing trivia games, board games, and watching shows and documentaries that appeal to their search for knowledge.

Conclusion

Knowing your personality?s DNA sets you on the path of alignment with everything you do. Even something as simple as finding a hobby can be a fulfilling and exciting experience when it works with your personality. Hobbies are meant to be fun and exciting getaways from the troubles of everyday life. The best way to know what personality best describes you is by taking a well-curated and effective personality test like the CVI. In this way, everything that defines you is used to find what you enjoy doing most.


Additional Articles and Resources


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Go to eRep.com/core-values-index/ to learn more about the CVI or to take the Core Values Index assessment.

The best way to discover the power of eRep Employer Services is to try our risk-free Discovery Program and get 3 CVIs for free without cost or obligation.



Patrick Bailey

Patrick Bailey

Contributor

Patrick Bailey is a professional writer mainly in the fields of mental health, addiction, and living in recovery. He attempts to stay on top of the latest news in the addiction and the mental health world and enjoys writing about these topics to break the stigma associated with them. 

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